art-of-swords
art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords
Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…
Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology
by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens
The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.
Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.
This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 
by Anne Stalsberg 
Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 
‘Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords

Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…

Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology

  • by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens

The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.

Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.

This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 

  • by Anne Stalsberg 

Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 

Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

cecilgershwinspalmer
themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

Yeah&#8230; all that&#8230; I would only add that there are times and places when you shouldn&#8217;t speak like that, but in casual conversation&#8230; go for it.

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

Yeah… all that… I would only add that there are times and places when you shouldn’t speak like that, but in casual conversation… go for it.

medieval-women

medieval-women:

Bawdy illustrations from Jeanne de Montbaston

These amusing bas-de-page images come from a mid-14th century manuscript of the ‘Roman de la Rose’.

Image 1: A nun harvests disembodied penises from a phallus tree.

Images 2-4: A monk and a nun engaging in a taboo relationship.

Image 5: A monk hands a nun a large disembodied penis. 

Image 6: A nun leads a monk is by a chain attached to his penis.

This risqué marginalia comes from a husband and wife team of Parisian artists, Richard and Jeanne de Montbaston, who copied and illuminated manuscripts. Jeanne operated independently after Richard’s death, the timing of which has lead some scholars to speculate that the whimsical illuminations in this particular manuscript were solely her creations. The images can be interpreted in a number of ways, possibly as a parody of spiritual love, a representation of the fear of dominating women and male impotence or purely as a humorous diversion.

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS. Fr. 25526, f. 106v.

Page-turn view of the entire manuscript.

Sources 1. 2. 3.

I laugh so hard whenever people try to tell me that the period I study was “all devoutly Christian” and “was sexually repressed.” Um. no.

gailsimone
gailsimone:

apanhadonarede:

(Secret Six, 11, “Depths”, part 2, “Amazons Unleashed”, 2009, Gail Simone, Nicola Scott, Doug Hazelwood, Marc McKenna) 

That was the weird thing about Secret Six, we got to talk about the shitty things cultures allow to happen, like torture and prison brutality, in a way that you couldn’t do in the normal comics featuring the ‘moral’ heroes.

gailsimone:

apanhadonarede:

(Secret Six, 11, “Depths”, part 2, “Amazons Unleashed”, 2009, Gail Simone, Nicola Scott, Doug Hazelwood, Marc McKenna) 

That was the weird thing about Secret Six, we got to talk about the shitty things cultures allow to happen, like torture and prison brutality, in a way that you couldn’t do in the normal comics featuring the ‘moral’ heroes.

themarysue
The action figures you can choose from are Captain America or Iron Man—which super mega blows, since the 3DPlusMe machine at cons also produces MODOK and Black Widow figures. Black Widow is even visible on the 3DPlusMe website. I mean, sure, I could head to a Walmart and have my face slapped on an Iron Man doll (boom! Lady Iron Man). But for countless young girls out there who love Black Widow, who love The Avengers, who saw Guardians of the Galaxy a bunch of times because Gamora is so awesome, *representation is important*. The whole point of this project is to literally put your face onto a superhero; to be able to envision yourself as a hero, to immerse yourself in that narrative. Marvel, Hasbro, and 3DPlusMe are telling girls that, unless they want to become traditionally male characters, they don’t get to be superheroes. That’s for boys. Safe to say, I’m pretty sick of this shit.